Sunday, June 21, 2020

Dillards Celebrate 6 Years

Happy six-year wedding anniversary to Jill and Derick Dillard!

Jill and Derick
2020
 
Jill and Derick
2016

Photos courtesy dillardfamily.com

134 comments:

  1. Happy Anniversary Jill and Derick!! Wishing you two the very best😍

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  2. Happy Father’s Day and Anniversary.

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  3. Happy Anniversary to a wonderful couple. I loved watching their wedding episode, but it was hard seeing JB cry. I just felt for him, knowing his little girl was now all grown up. Wishing Jill and Derick many more happy years together.

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  4. Happy 6th Anniversary Jill&Derick!

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  5. Wow, already 6 years. I remember how they got married, she was the first Duggar daughter to get married. Two kids, a house, several long-stay trips to Central America. I wonder what Jill was dreaming about when she was getting married and if her dreams came true.

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    1. She was going to be a midwife while the husband was a professional working as an accountant. Now she is married to a student and stays at home with kids.

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    2. Anon 1:43, you say that as if there is something wrong with furthering one's education or raising a family. Why is that?

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    3. 7:50 perhaps 1:43 is wondering what happened to Jill's midwife dream.....Derick is pursuing his educational goal while Jill seems to have dropped hers?

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    4. 7:50 AM: Derick already has a BA degree in Accounting, he also did some ministerial studies, and now he is in law school pursuing another degree. It's not really "furthering education", it's not knowing what he wants and being a student for life.

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    5. Jill actually passed some midwifery exam, so I think she could work. She just did not. She is a home stay mom now.

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    6. She is not currently registered on any Ark. midwife registry. Don't those exam qualifications eventually lapse? It was such a low-level qualification to begin with, and no hospitals in Ark. allow someone at that level to attend births in their facilities. So not exactly a career.

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    7. Jill was a CPM (Certified Professional Midwife), not a CNM (Certified Nurse Midwife). A CPM is a professional midwifery practitioner who has met the standards for certification se Although the Licensed Lay Midwife is not a Physician or Certified Nurse Midwife, she is trained in prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum care, and newborn care. Jill is no longer listed on the Arkansas State Registry.
      Per Arkansas State Law for LLM births: Risk assessments shall be performed by a physician, a CNM or an ADH clinician.The purpose of these visits is to ensure that the client has no potentially serious medical conditions and has no medical contraindications to home birth. Each risk assessment must be filed in the client‟s medical record.The risk assessments must be comprehensive enough for the LLM to identify potentially dangerous conditions that may preclude midwifery care, or that require physician or CNM consultation. Each client must be evaluated by a physician, a CNM, or an ADH clinician at the following times: At or near the 36thweek of gestation and must include: Review of the client‟s complete prenatal record. Pertinent physical examination, including: Measurements of blood pressure, weight, Fundal height, Estimated gestational age, Fetal presentation/position. Frequency of Visits: Routine antepartum visits must be made approximately every four (4) weeks during the first 28 weeks of gestation, approximately every two (2) weeks from the 28th to 36th weeks, and weekly thereafter until delivery. Services At each visit: the LLM will perform and record the following services: Fundal height, Determination of fetal position, Fetal heart rate (etc.)
      In other words, Jill and her mentor Midwife were supposed to have known through Risk assessments and the weekly check-ups at 36 weeks, that several of the Duggar daughters' babies were too large for a safe vaginal delivery, the babies were breech, and Jessa's history of bleeding out required a medical professional (by law, someone more qualified with a higher licensure than a CPM).

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    8. Before they married, they felt called to be with each other since they were both missions minded. That didn't last very long.

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    9. I've seen on social media that Jill is undergoing professional therapy, Derick said she has issues with boundaries. Seems this could be an issue for some of the other Duggar kids. The Duggar's don't teacher their kids to think for themselves and as they go out into the world it becomes painfully obvious. Jinger is going through a metamorphosis into who she is not who she was programmed to be, so is Jill.

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  6. Congratulations Jill and Derick! I expect the next year Derick will graduate law school, and maybe they will move?

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    1. Why would they move ,they bought their house just a year ago,not all lawyers want big expensive homes,they also enrolded their son at playschool and now there's this pandemic they will probably have no choice but to enrol him up for homeschooling until all this is over,I am going to homeschool my son until this pandemic is completely over,here in Uk a playschool had to close down after various children were infected,its just too risky to get back to normal now imo.

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    2. First of all, Derick is not a lawyer, he is a student. Last time he was studying at the university, he went straight on a mission field after he graduated. I think Derick likes free lifestyle, no schedules and so he chooses this path. Hopefully legal field will be suitable for his character. But I'm not sure how much work he can get in the rural area they live in. They could move within the province or just to a mission, to another country.

      They enrolled their son in kindergarten for the upcoming year, when Derick is still will be in school as well.

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    3. House ownership is more efficient than paying rent, you earn towards your equity and your interest is tax deductible. They can always sell.

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    4. I'll bet Jill can't wait til Derick's a lawyer so she can bring the boys and lunch to the office every day, like she used to.

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    5. 2:49: Jill was bringing lunch to Derick when he was working as an accountant, and at that time they did not have any children. So in actuality she never brought the boys to his office. Possibly she brought baby Israel once or twice, but then Derick quit his job, and he never worked after Sam was born 3 years ago. Only like pizza delivery guy.

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    6. @11:53 Jill took meals to Derick at college, until recently, with the boys along. Remember the pictures taken at the dining area at school?

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    7. @2:49 Once? To take a picture? To get away from home? Definitely NOT every day.

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    8. It wasn't once. She took meals plural, she went to his classes, and now she's going around with him while he delivers food.

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    9. As much as I like Jill, I think she may be a bit co-dependent judging by some of her past and current behaviors and some things she says.

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  7. Happy Anniversary Jill and Derick. They look so matured in their recent picture and Derick's teeth look so nice.

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    1. It's always sad to see how a happy looking girl full of happy expectations looks matured with sad eyes.

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    2. Here eyes don't look sad at all. She has a wonderful husband who's in law school and two great kids.

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    3. 1:45: Nothing about her eyes now looks sad to me.

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    4. They could just be tired eyes, which is very common for moms with young kids!

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  8. MO- It's nice to see Jill and Derick. We don't get to hear about them these days... I'm happy that Derick is almost out of Law School so he can provide a good life for his family. I'm also happy that Derick is not employed by Jim Bob, that's all about control... :o(

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    1. You could have left the part about Jim-Bob out. I honestly don't think it's about control. I think he honestly wants to help his children.

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    2. Derick is not "almost out" of law school, he did only 2 years out of 3, it's a whole year ahead. He already has an Accounting degree, and he already could provide well for his family. He however quit his accounting job and went to another school to study.

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    3. Or it’s all about that they enjoy working for their dad. No one is forced to work for him!

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    4. Okay, so technically he's 2/3 of the way through, if you want to nitpick.

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    5. Anon 9:03. If JB wanted to help his children, he would send them to college or trade school so they could get job skills and be able to earn a living without "working for the family" and living at home until they marry.

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    6. I find it weird that they say they are called to do international ministering but he studied accounting and now law. Perhaps he would be better off studying ministry of something internationally related? The only thing he seems to be working toward is delivering food and being a career student.

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    7. Control? Jim Bob is a wonderful father who helps his children. I wish I had someone like this for a dad. If his kids need help, they have a dad to help them. And that's why they all work together in businesses established by Jim Bob or being helped to be established by him. I think it's a wonderful thing and not about any control.

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    8. 9:03 The Duggars are affiliated with ILBP in Texas. Part of their doctrine includes keeping your kids close to home, especially unmarried daughters. Secular education or employment is discouraged. Working in a family business is the ideal. A woman's role is to be a wife, mother and homemaker. The Duggar kids were brought up on these teachings and think it's God's way.

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    9. 7:54 AM: who said that college gives people real skills? And what are those skills? They own car dealerships. They are all licensed real estate agents. They are good at any type of manual labor. They fix houses for resale. That's a skill!

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    10. 7:59. Derick DID study something ministry-related. That's what he was doing between coming off the field and going into law school.

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    11. @2:26- What do you consider "real skills"? I hope you're not implying that going to college is a waste of time. Our society would be in big trouble if no one furthered their education to become doctors, lawyers, dentists, teachers, scientists, accountants, architects, engineers, nurses, physical therapists, psychiatrists, social workers, law enforcement, biologists, chemists, etc. etc. My son spent many years studying to be an electrical engineer. I can assure you, it takes mathematical and scientific skills to do his job. As far as used car lots, house flippers, and real estate agents, they're a dime a dozen.

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    12. To those being critical of Derick's career changes, I would say that perhaps he floundered a bit in this department by marrying into the Duggar family. We have no way of knowing if there was pressure by JB for them to go to Central America. It certainly made for TLC content. It certainly interrupted his stint as an accountant. This TV family has a lot to gain by keeping the cameras rolling. From what Derick himself has stated, I think he and Jill were caught in a control struggle with JB over the programming revenue/contracts and that's why they quit filming. For all we know, Derick may have had an inheritance or life insurance from his dad that has allowed him to go to law school. Most cops I know carry quite a bit of insurance and his mom may have kept it in a trust for him. Anyway, even though I do not agree with some of the controversial things he has said in the past, I have to give him credit for having the gumption to go to law school. It's not easy! His family went to public schools and colleges, so Jill is seeing that the secular world is not all evil like she was brought up to believe. I also think Jill has become more of her own person since being married to him. Watching some of their Instagram stories, it's refreshing to see that she speaks up and has her own opinions, which is quite different from the image her mother projects. Michelle always gazed adoringly at JimBob, speaking in this soft and reverent tone, like he could do no wrong. It's hard to imagine she would ever disagree with him or openly challenge him on anything. I always found that hard to stomach.

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    13. 11:49, I don't think that the OP was nitpicking saying that Derick still has 1 year of school left. Derick seem to be changing his mind about his profession a lot, so until he is really graduating nobody knows where the wind can blow.

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    14. @9:31PM Totally agree with what you said. Also wondering why no Duggar ever enters the military? They love this country and they don't mind carrying guns, so why not serve the country and get paid to do it? The military will teach you job skills, too.

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    15. @9:03 if JB wanted to help his kids he would make sure that they had a decent education from the very beginning. Also college or some kind of technical training. That includes the girls as well as the boys. As much as I don't agree with some of the things Derrick has said I give him credit for getting Jill away from her family. Their boys will have the best chance for a normal life.

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    16. @9:14 All the Duggar kids have a high school diploma on a strong homeschooling program. They ARE educated.
      And giving credit to someone for getting a daughter away from her loving family, that's plain ridiculous!

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    17. @6:58 Their home schooling program is not strong. Arkansas doesn't even require testing or grade reporting.

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    18. 9:25, that doesn't make sense. A strong program is a strong program, whether you undergo achievements tests or not. My kids are getting the same education in whatever state we have lived in, both the states that required testing and the states that did not.

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    19. @12:03- Just because you have a "strong program" does not automatically mean the homeschool children, or students in any public school, are going to do well. You have to factor in teacher effectiveness as well. I have always considered teaching to be an art form. There are those that have the knack for it and those that simply do not.
      “I am not a teacher, but an awakener.”― Robert Frost

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    20. Where I live if you homeschooled the kids have to take tests to make sure they're getting the education they need @9:14 they're not getting that education t There program is not a strong program. There are good homeschooled programs out there. Theirs is not one of them

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    21. 3:17, I understand what you are saying, but my point was not that the Duggars have a strong program or anything about the quality of their teacher or whether the definition of a strong program does or does not include the factor of a teacher's attributes. My point was strictly that you can't judge the strength of a program based on whether you test or not. Testing reflects strength but does not bestow strength. 9:25's statement was not logically sound, and that was the only thing I was addressing.

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  9. Happy Anniversary

    Derick & Jill Dillard

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  10. Great to see you, Happy Anniversary and send blessings.

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  11. Happy Anniversary Jill and Derick! You're my favorite couple. I wish you were back on Counting On. Natasha B.

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  12. Happy Anniversary

    Derick & Jill Dillard

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  13. Hope they had a good Anniversary!

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  14. Here's hoping, that Jill & Derick, enjoyed their 6th Wedding Anniversary!!!!

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  15. Happy 6th Anniversary Jill and Derrick. I've enjoyed watching the show where you met in Nepal and following your courtship and engagement. Your wedding was beautiful. Natasha B.

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  16. I'm guessing they didn't spend the day at the big house with Jill's family.

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    1. Why would they do that? It's THEIR anniversary not the rest of the family's anniversary.

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    2. That was Father's Day too wasn't it?

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  17. It's nice to see Derrick and Jill. I think it's awesome and refreshing how they are taking a different course in life and have decided to leave the reality gravy train behind and have instead become an independent family. I'm proud of them and am looking forward to see all that life holds in store for this strong couple and their children.

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    1. Is their split from the Duggar family reality show Jill’s choice, or is she just being a “dutiful wife.” At first, I thought Derrick was great! But he turned out to be terribly controlling. I find the situation troubling. Everything they do seems to be for building up Derrick’s life and his career. I just hope Jill isn’t being lost in the process. John David, Joseph, and Ben, for example, are intent on building up their wives, as well as themselves. Derrick doesn’t seem intent on doing that. Honestly, what do we ever hear about Jill? It’s all about Derrick.

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    2. 8:52 AM: How Joseph is "building up" Kendra?? She had 2 kids in 2 years and she is only 1! Kendra will be having more and kids. Abbie did not work since she moved to Arkansas with JD in 2018. Jessa never worked in her life, has 3 kids within 5 years of marriage and a housewife like her mom.

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    3. At least Derick pulled the reality show plug, give him that much. If he truly writes that tell-all book he has hinted about, and if it truly tells all, stand back.

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    4. Jill has so much more freedom then the other girls! Here childeren are getting a real education. And she has only 2.

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    5. My kids are getting a "real" education while homeschooling. You don't even know what caliber of education her son will be getting in public school. The quality varies in this country, and we rank behind other countries.

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    6. A "real education"? You're kidding right? Where do these lies and misconceptions come from? My home-schooled teenager is completing the last week of a Driver's Ed through a very reputable driving school in our area. She's been appalled at the number of public-schooled kids in this class that had to ask the instructor how to spell "yield" and the lazy attitudes of those classmates (most of whom failed their final exam today and will need to retest). She's been heartbroken and angered for the kids who were obviously passed and graduated with serious learning disabilities and who are now struggling in real life situations (through no fault of their own). She's worked hard for every grade she's ever gotten (straight A student, in the 99th percentile on yearly standardized testing), wouldn't dream of goofing off in class or disrespecting her instructors. She can hold her own factually in any political, scientific, or history discussion. She's a self-motivated learner. All of which is more than I can say for the majority of her public-schooled contemporaries. You know the system is broken when retired teachers have regularly thanked us for choosing to home-school (some of which were my own former teachers). Please educate yourself about what homeschooling really involves, who homeschools and why, and spend some time with a variety of homeschooling families (parents and children). The Duggars (nor IBLP) are the face of homeschooling...nor are a small number of people notoriously removing their children from school to hide their child abuse under a homeschooling "flag".

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    7. Anon 6:57. There are pros and cons to both public and home schooling. I think we should avoid the broad generalizations you use and PLEASE stop the disdain (it's not very helpful). The majority of those attending public school get a good education due to the dedication and hard work of their teachers along with parental support. Many of us (including myself who as a single parent had to work to support my family) cannot stay at home and school our children. I'm sure your daughter is a wonderful student but so are many who attend public school. I think you've overstated the problems in public schools. However, well meaning I fear that you've instilled an attitude of superiority in your daughter. Those will intellectual disabilities will never have the success in school that the rest of the students can achieve. If you're happy with your choice to home school your daughter, let it go at that.

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    8. @6:57 That's YOUR home school. The Duggar home school is different. There we saw kids doing remedial basic math flash cards well above the age when those skills are taught in public school, and workbooks from below grade level. We never heard of their taking standardized tests like the PSAT, ACT, or SAT. We saw their faith-based curriculum, which was quite different than any public school curriculum, especially in the sciences.

      This year will be one big "experiment" in home schooling for the United States, with public schools closed since March for most of the country. The divide between the "haves" (have computers, have internet connection, have parents willing and able to become teachers overnight) and the "have-nots" was the first thing to become apparent. Now (public school) teachers are worried about the kids who aren't studying (I heard 48% were not) or were falling behind, and what that will do to those kids once school does start again. This "forced" homeschooling year is going to take its toll on them. Homeschooling will not have worked for them.

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    9. 6:57- I would agree that there are some people who are quick to judge and criticize homeschooling. Many kids do just great in that environment. However, your comments are a very tired overgeneralization of public schools. You imply that the "majority" of public school kids are not motivated or successful like your daughter. My own kids went to public schools and colleges and they have been and are very successful. Public schools are challenged with educating EVERYONE, no matter the disability, socio-economic circumstances, or languages spoken. I would say that the majority are doing a darn good job under the circumstances. It's an unfair comparison, because homeschooling parents are responsible for only their own children. Perhaps if you were charged with teaching special needs and ELL students at the same time, you'd have a more realistic perspective and give some credit to the countless effective teachers and successful students who seem to get lost in this public school bashing climate.
      seem to be lost

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    10. 4:08: "Real education" in overfilled classrooms with teachers who don't pay attention to each and every kid? And where kids are made into standardized little machines? And if a kid has a little personality and more smart than others, they are labeled "special"? Where bullying is a norm? With kids trying drugs and smoking at very early age? Right.

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    11. You know, a parent's responsibility doesn't end when you drop your kid at the door of a public school. If your school is "failing" your child somehow, then it's up to you to change that and be the advocate for your child. Just like homeschooling, you're responsible. Don't blame others if you're "failing" your child too.

      @4:08 Standardized little machines? Guess you haven't been in a school lately or seen the wide range of interests and abilities there. Yes, kids that are more smart than others are "special." They need "special" teachers and programs, and that has to be worked into the budget. Remember, these kids are going to be your doctors and other professionals someday. Be glad they're smart.

      You make it sound like kids are handed cigarettes and drugs at the door when school starts. It's not like that at all. As far as bullying, schools have prevention programs. I was bullied at home by my siblings but never at school! School was a pleasure.

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    12. Anonymous @ 6:57 here and my comments stand. Many on this board regularly and routinely disparage homeschooling as not "real school", having zero experience in homeschooling and little to no interaction with homeschooling families (plural)...and yet I'm accused of "tired overgeneralization of public school" and "disdain"? That's a bit of a double standard. My comments were in direct response to that attitude of superiority. I anticipated the usual misconceptions/lies about homeschooling that usually accompany such posts (stating my daughter's record of hard work)-we regularly get verbally attacked when someone learns we home school. I'm sorry if somehow that was misinterpreted as bragging or superiority-it was neither. My post clearly stated "She's been heartbroken and angered for the kids who were obviously passed and graduated with serious learning disabilities and who are now struggling in real life situations (through no fault of their own)". You know nothing about me, my educational background or teaching experience. Do you honestly think that there are no homeschooling families with special needs children? I know several personally. Do you think that there are no home school ESL families? I know some (one of those mothers is now teaching Spanish part-time in her local public elementary school, having taught in her home school co-op for years). FYI: Ask any teacher in any public school in any community in America, and THEY will tell you the system is broken. I haven't said anything the teachers in your school district haven't already said regularly. It is a disservice to the child to pass them, knowing they do not have the skill set to succeed and fulfill their own potential and the teachers are just as upset about it. Sometimes that's a parental fail because the parents think it's the teacher's job alone. ("that's what we pay them for"). Any teacher will tell you that not all parents are as engaged and interested as Anonymous @ 9:13 and Anonymous @ 10:02. Obviously, single parents are carrying a massive load (as are families caring for a someone with a serious health issue or dying, or income-challenged families), but this discussion was provoked by a poster bashing home schooling as not "real education". Sometimes, it's a bad teacher. The vast majority of teachers invest heart & soul into "their kids", doing a job that doesn't pay near enough, and their hands are tied classroom management-wise. Often it's the administration (principal/ school board) needing successful "pass rates" to ensure public funding and attract more parents to their school district, ensuring more funding, and the cycle is perpetuated as the principal's salary is tied to that. I'm well-acquainted with the system myself. As very for a superiority complex-hardly. We have several good friends who public school their children very successfully, friends with 1 child in public school and 1 home schooled, and friends who home school. We're pretty inclusive. We don't think home schooling is perfect, nor for everyone. What we are is angry, when anyone's children are shortchanged and left struggling as young adults. It breaks our hearts that the child/young adult is left feeling self-conscious, with low self-esteem, often too afraid of being mocked or too embarrassed to ask for help. That's just plain wrong.

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    13. How did a post about a couples anniversary turn into a debate about homeschool....who else is tired of this same ole same ole battle. Let it go, each to their own, there are good and bad situations on both sides.

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    14. Anon 7:50. I don't think you're being criticized for home schooling your child. However, you come across as extremely angry and defensive. As for your comments about the intellectually disabled, how long do you expect the public school system to keep these people in their schools? Of course they can't keep them the rest of their lives. I have friends with a disabled daughter. She "aged out of school" (at 22) and her parents made other arrangements for her. Of course disabled people struggle in life and no amount of education is going to fix that. My niece's husband works at a disabled adult center and yes the the disabled adults in that program struggle. It's NOT the fault of the school system or even the disabled person's fault. It's just what happens when someone isn't capable of functioning the world. Sorry you're so upset.

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    15. Anon 7:50 I'm sorry you are so offended by some of the comments regarding home schooling. To be fair IMO most of the more negative remarks are triggered by the type of home schooling practiced by the Duggars. What we see from them reinforces a perception that children aren't getting a good education. We see the Duggar children working on math that is far below what is expected at their age in public school. They use material that is below what is considered grade level for workbooks, etc. None of the children have been encouraged to explore career options in STEM (or any other field for that matter). When the ONLY career any of them want is to work for JB (the male offspring) and to be a SAHM (females) it shows the adult offspring haven't gotten much of an education. Being "short changed in academics doesn't jut happen in public schools. It happens when children are home schooled as well.

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    16. 7:50- I am Anon@ 10:02. You really don't know anything about me or other commenters, either. I am a retired public school teacher, having spent 36 years in the classroom as a special education and regular ed teacher. Public schools are not without their problems or disengaged students and parents. I can attest to that. However, I feel your comments are very divisive and inflammatory, just as are the comments that bash homeschooling. You negatively paint all of public education with a very broad brush. Furthermore, your overgeneralizations are based entirely on your own anecdotal experiences. BTW, you mention your daughter was shocked by the students in her driver's ed class who had graduated with so few skills. That's one class in a driving school and is an example of anecdotal evidence. It does not give a fair assessment of the majority of public school students. They not only obtain their driver's licenses when they're 16, but also go on to graduate from high school with respectable GPA's, as did my own kids and their friends. Regarding teaching special needs kids and ELL students- I doubt there's a homeschool parent anywhere who has a class of 30 students where they are expected to meet the needs of every single one of them, regardless of disability or languages spoken.

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    17. Anon 8:34. Thank you for your thoughtful comments. I have found that whenever someone has an "ax to grind" they seek out information that supports their opinion. That appears to be the case here. I don't think public schools "short change" students. In my own family I saw that my niece was a great student, did well and went to a good college. On the other hand my nephew hated school and barely got through high school. He can't do more than basic arithmetic and says no one needs math. He short changed himself. There's an old saying "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink". Our public schools do the best they can to educate all comers, no matter what their ability and background. They can't force children to learn. To: Anon 7:50 basing your opinion of public education on your daughter's experience in a driving class is pretty unfair to say the least.

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    18. A public school education gave my son 2 full scholarships to college and offered him opportunities I never could have provided if I had taught him at home. He was able to compete in local, state, and international academic competitions, with wins that then became scholarship application entries. He attended a local college for 1 class in 11th grade and half a day in 12th. He was offered a job as an assistant to a professor there while in 11th grade.

      Bashing public schools is unfair. You get out of them what you put into them. I was there every step of the way for 13 years to make sure it was a worthwhile experience, even holding a place on the PTA board, and it paid off. Free education from kindergarten through bachelor's degree, with a successful career that followed! He's not selling used cars in a small town in the Midwest, and I guarantee you he can name a Greek god. Not bad for a "standardized little machine" from public school. No smoking or doing drugs, either.

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    19. 9:55 AM -- School districts have spent millions to make sure their students -- thousands of whom are homeless -- have tablets and hot spots for internet connectivity during the lockdown. I know this from a relative in the telecomm business. There's no need to feel that any child has been left behind during covid.

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    20. These comments for and against public schools, these generalizations on the poor quality of public school education, I have only one response. If the schools in the US are so poor, what are you doing about it? After all, the economic health and political stability of ANY country depends on the education level of its citizens, ALL of its citizens. Every child,even a poor child, deserves a good quality education.

      Here, we take educating our children very seriously and it shows in our international test results and our high level of post-secondary education levels. If we can do it, you can do it too.

      This is not to say that we do not have problems in our schools. But we work at the problems, with the results that we have a very strong public system, rated higher than the private schools.

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    21. @3:17 While tablets and hot spots may have been provided, they were slow to be distributed, and there is evidence that they are not being used. I heard someone on NPR the other day talking about what a large percentage of students are not keeping up with the assigned work. Just because you were given a tablet doesn't mean you're doing the work or retaining what you're supposed to be learning. The first thing states are going to have to do in the coming school year, however that reopening will happen, is testing to see how far behind students have fallen.

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    22. 9:29- I am a retired public school teacher. I can assure you, students are routinely assessed at the start of each school year.

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    23. @9:43 You can see what they're doing about poor education...taking every opportunity to bash the system and trying to convince you that homeschooling is superior, even home schools with parents who have little ability to teach. No thanks. I don't want Michelle or Ben teaching my kids calculus or AP physics.

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    24. @9:43 schools in the US aren't as bad as some people here indicate. It's what the child and parents put into it. My daughter and grandson both graduated from the same school district and they received a great education. Also neither one of them do drugs.

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  18. Wishing you many more years of happiness and love. God Bless.
    HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
    Joan,Marion and Marilyn

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  19. Happy Anniversary to my favourite ‘Duggar’ couple. Wishing you many,many more years of happiness.

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  20. They seem like a great couple who truly did leave and cleave. God bless them.

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    1. Uhm, not exactly. Jill's family was back and forth regularly to Central America during their term, when she wasn't Skyping with them or flying back herself for short visits. Jim Bob set them up in a house when they first married. That's not exactly leaving and cleaving.

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    2. 6:59, they are definitely in the "left and cleft" category now! That's what the OP is referring to.

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    3. Leave and cleave? Did you see a mansion that Jim Bob gave them to live in when they just got married? And where they lived for over a year? The same Jim Bob came to Central America to see them and installed AC in their house!

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    4. Derick has relied on Jim Bob, his mom, and the public in the past to fund his lifestyle. The Dillards had free housing for the first four years of marriage and constantly asked others for donations.
      They are still relying on outside help as it's unlikely the part time job Derick has now can pay for his law school tuition and support Jill and the boys. It's fine that they need help, just don't pretend have leaved and cleaved.

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    5. Leave and cleave doesn't mean your family can't visit or do nice things for you and give you gifts. Where do people get that idea? It's certainly not Biblical.

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    6. 11:17, that was then. Things have changed. They are living their own independent life now.

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  21. Here's hoping that Anna, is enjoying her 32nd Birthday!!!!

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  22. Do any of the Diggers actually read this blog I wonder? People posting her talk like they are speaking directly to them. This is not their own official site.

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    1. Most public figures make it a habit to stay away from fan pages....probably due to negative comments.

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  23. It's been a rollercoaster ride for Jill. Having those 70=hour labors before 2 emergency c-sections; her brother's scandal and her talking on TV about while pregnant; living in central america with no conveniences; husband going from being an accountant to unemployed to student.

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    1. I'd hardly call a fully-furnished, air-conditioned house with indoor plumbing/bathroom/washing machine, within a gated compound with armed guards and a Ford truck at your disposal to take you to Wal-Mart, as having "no conveniences." If Jill lacked anything it was a dishwasher, but she made do with the sink and a dish drying rack. You might have her house confused with the houses of the people they were there to help, who truly had NO conveniences - open-air houses, no appliances, no a/c, no indoor plumbing, and certainly no vehicle or guards.

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    2. Her parents installed Air Conditioning in their walled and guarded mission compound house in Central America (the house with electricity, running water, washer & dryer, and internet access)= lots of conveniences.

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    3. One of Jill's own making. She and Derrick WANTED to be missionaries. When they got to Central America they had a nice house complete with air conditioning and JILL was still unable to cope with the mission field. That meant they had to come home and Derrick had to find some other way to support the family since Jill doesn't work outside the home. Derrick chose to become a lawyer. He won't be a "student" forever and will have career opportunities after law school. IMO Jill has had a pretty cushy life.

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    4. Jill's missionary ambitions were loftier than her abilities. She went to pieces the night something fell in the bathroom of that mission house. She couldn't handle the stress of being away from her home and family. She thought she was in danger the whole time she was at that (guarded) house. Missionaries need nerves of steel, and that's not Jill.

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    5. 5:46, she "went to pieces" because hearing gunshots was a normal thing for them, and the bathroom noise was right there in their house.

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    6. Anon 12:05. I live in a rural area and gun shots are pretty routine here. One of the houses down the street has a firing range in the back yard. Should I panic every time I heard gunfire or a noise in my house?

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  24. Jessa will have 6 years in November, and they have such different paths even though they are sisters in a very tight knit family.

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    1. Jill and Jessa are on very similar paths. They are both stay at home moms....I'm not seeing the differences.

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    2. One doing public school, the other will probably hone school. They dress differently. They have different relationships with their parents. Those are differences.

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  25. Strange comment above Jills eyes are tired looking because she has 2 small kids ? Really hope doesnt have another one if the above commenter feels that way.

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    1. I was the one who made the comment about tired eyes. I have five kids. I know what tired eyes look like, and they didn't stop me from having five kids. πŸ˜‚ To think that moms with young kids don't ever look or feel tired is unrealistic, and my comment is just an alternate theory to her eyes looking "sad." I hope that whether or not you think she should have another one is not really connected to my opinion, and that she does not make that choice based on any commenter's opinion.

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    2. πŸ˜„ I and many other moms I know don't think that's a strange concept. I'm guessing you've never had children? They can get up way earlier than you want to be up, and then you have to get up because they're crying in their crib or because they're not crying, they're dumping out a box of cereal on the floor or coloring the bathroom rug with your makeup. You're tired because they keep you on the go all day and then you stay up too late because you want to finish the laundry or relax with your husband or can't shut off your worries about your children's future in this scary world or wondering if you have messed them up for life because you're an imperfect parent. You're tired because there are never enough hours in the day. You're tired because your body needs more vegetables and water and less coffee and chocolate, but you're convinced that more caffeine is what you need to push you through. You're tired because of hormonal changes. No, the comment about tired eyes is not "strange," it's real life, and it can be true whether one has one child or nineteen.

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    3. Being a mother is a 24/7 job, no paid time off, no sick days, next to zero breaks. With small ones, you’re lucky to get to the bathroom or take a shower. When I look back, those years are a blur! Love my kids, but
      it was exhausting! Even after they grow up and leave home, you still worry about them. If Jill has tired eyes, she’s earned them!

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  26. My favorite. Like a rebel you go JILL!

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  27. Let's go easy on the woman or whomever made the comment about tired eye's.

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    1. Do you mean the commenter who said maybe Jill's eyes look tired rather than sad? Or the person who said the tired eyes comment was strange? The first person was suggesting that maybe Jill's eyes look tired rather than sad. The second person called that comment strange and said they hoped Jill doesn't have any more children if the first commenter thinks her eyes look tired. The other commenters were pointing out to #2 why it is not a strange comment to say that a mom could have tired looking eyes, from their personal experience, since #2 didn't seem to understand the original tired eyes comment.

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  28. I know Derrick was upset with TLC and Jim Bob over the money aspect of the show. But I don’t understand why Jim Bob is so upset that he actually banned Derrick from their home. Is it the book? The feud must put poor Jill in a horrible position.

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    1. Who knows what is going on in the family? There are many rumors, few facts. So far Derrick hasn't had a "tell all" book published and it may never happen.

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  29. I know Derrick and Jill have always had aspirations to serve overseas, doing God’s work. Do you think Derrick could practice law where they go? Doesn’t he have to be certified in whatever particular country they choose to live. Would he do pro bono law for the poor, or would he practice law for the church itself? Or would he not practice law and go back to ministry.

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    1. They WENT overseas (to Central America). Have you forgotten that period in their lives? Jill was terrified the whole time. I don't think Derrick will ever forget it and try to serve in the mission field again or even try to live in another country.

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  30. I was a stay at home mother of two boys with a house to care for. My husband worked outside the home. It really was not THAT difficult to do. My whole day and week was surrounded by those chores and errands that needed to get done. I had 50 hours a week to do them. If you are organized and actually DO the things necessary, you should not be SO TIRED. I had weekends off too from those things and spent time with my family. Jill needs an organization chart and to stick to it. Also, I did not sleep until 10:00 am every day. I was the first one up at 5:30am to get breakfast ready. I built in time for myself that first hour of the day and enjoyed my cup of coffee and newspaper before waking the others for school and work. Summer vacation for the children went smoothly too. Swim lessons first thing in the morning one week every summer for them. They never missed one. It's doable, Jill.

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    1. @7:10- That's terrific you were such a wonderful, organized and efficient SAHM! Perhaps you could hire yourself out to be a consultant to haggard and overwhelmed mothers everywhere and show them how it's done. Regardless, I don't think Jill was complaining of being very tired, rather it was a commenter who thought she looked tired in the photo.

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    2. And the only reason that I brought up "tired" was because someone else commented that her eyes looked "sad." It was just an alternate theory.

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    3. How did you get weekends "off" from household chores like cooking meals, making beds, etc.? Never happens at my house. And my kids sometimes get sick and that sort of disrupts things too.

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    4. I agree @7:10am!

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    5. Except there's a world of difference between being a stay at home mom and a homeschooling mom. Not the same thing at all. Stay at home moms can focus pretty exclusively on just getting the house cleaned, run errands, make appointments, run the children to and from activities, volunteer in their children's schools/take on PTA or PTO positions (if they choose). Homeschooling moms are doing all of that, plus they're the ones doing the teaching (many actually do the lion's share of the teaching, not use video teaching), grading, and planning. Not that we're complaining, we made the choice. But there is a definite difference between being a stay at home mom and a homeschooling one.

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  31. Thank you commenter June 28 @ 7:10am you said it perfectly.

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  32. If Jill would only pick up the phone and call Jana for help....Or Josie, who might enjoy a little more practice at child care, now that she has sewing and housekeeping under her belt.

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  33. "Weekends off" meant that no big cleaning was done; just straightened up the house; made the beds; no grocery shopping or errands; we went out to eat dinner on Saturdays, whatever we could afford; went to church on Sunday morning; kids went to Sunday school. It took no time at all to straighten up the house in the morning on the weekend because the large cleaning was already done. In comparison to the weekday chores and errands weekends were much calmer. I also had a larger house than Jill. My children attended school so that gave me uninterrupted time to clean up. Before they started school, they weren't 'in the way' of cleaning up. I also don't think that I was perfect in any way. I was not and I am not perfect. My post stated that I had a good routine planned out for the week; and yes, my children did get sick from time to time which involved taking them to their doctor and caring for them.

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    1. Wow. That was quite different from your previous post. I suppose your appliances never broke down or your plumbing never gave trouble in your well run household. lol

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    2. I once was in a Sunday School class with a woman who went on and on about her perfectly run household. Unfortunately her husband was also in the class and gave us a totally different story. lol

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    3. Anonymous @ 4:52- Thanks for the laugh! I know a few people with perfectly run households. Unfortunately, they either have failing marriages or their children aren't the angels the moms report them to be, or both. Nothing wrong with managing your home well, as long as it's neither your priority, nor your source of self-worth or value (not saying any if this is the case with Anonymous @ 7:10). She sounds like she probably has a management/organizational gift. Some people are more gifted in that area than others. Just like some are gifted to teach and some are gifted to support those who teach and do that very well. Some are gifted problem solvers; some are electronically/technologically gifted; some are gifted craftsmen.

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  34. If I had two children instead of five and if they went to school rather than being at home, and if I hadn't had a chronic health issue, I could probably have said the same as the OP. But those weren't my circumstances. I would love to not be tired and have the energy to do everything well.

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