Sunday, August 25, 2013

Michelle: Tips on Parenting Teens

How do the Duggars shepherd their children through the teenage years? In her latest video blog post, Michelle shares what she and Jim Bob have learned about parenting young adults.

Disclaimer: the spelling mistake in the video title is not ours:)

17 comments:

  1. Loving these videos. Great advice. :-)

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  2. Thanks so much Michelle. This is great advice.

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  3. I agree with the advice from Michelle to recall how you, as a parent now, felt as a teen. That mind set is very important. I agree with her on her points about being understanding and encouraging; which I practice possibly too much! Michelle does not share if one of her teens does not apologize/ humble themselves or if they took back to her; what are her consequences to that behavior? However, her teens are being raised in a very structured, conservative environment with rules created by her, JimBob and Gotthard teachings. A home very different from how they were raised and how my children are being brought up. Main stream teens deal with many more complicated issues, temptations and emotions than teens schooled at home with their siblings and never allowed to leave home without an accountability buddy. Therefore, Michelle's technique really cannot apply effectively to most non-ATI families.

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    1. Appreciate your input, but don't see why you don't think this good and very basic advice is applicable to teens in all situations?

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    2. Main stream teens can be involved in situations over their head-drug use, under age drinking, school peer pressure, bullying, college decisions, athletic competitiveness that require more than "basic" advice! Michelle's children are apart from those temptations and situations. Therefore, basic, good advice is appropriate for the Duggar teens since they a never exposed to the above situations.

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  4. Just thought you might want to know that the video title "Challanges" is spelled wrong. Sorry, my crazy English editing skills at work! It should be an 'e' after the last 'l'. Challenges.

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    1. I'm envious of your spelling ability! One of my difficulties -- and dyslexia doesn't help either. I joke that after they taught me to spell my name in 6th grade, they gave up on the rest of the words :o Even so I use my kickname as much as possible --Kay

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  5. The most important thing that teens have to learn is how to make decisions on their own. Adult life is complex and full of forks in the road; a young person who has had no practice in making his or her own decisions and then living with the results (good or bad) is not equipped to be an adult. It does not seem to me that the Duggar teens get any practice at all in making decisions--even what they wear is dictated--they have no opportunity to choose friends except perhaps from among a very small group of preselected peers; they don't get to choose their own classes at a high school or a college; vocational choices are severely limited by their lack of educational choices.

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    1. Your comment demonstrates that you really don't know the Duggars very well.

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    2. @Anonynous 7:38-most of us here do not know the Duggars well; we base our comments on what we see on their show. Please enlighten us as to the types of complex decisions any of the Duggar teens have made by themselves????

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    3. If you really want to know the answers to all your questions, you would need to read the two books that they published. Also, more importantly in pertaining to the older children, the older Duggar girls are writing a book to address the many misconceptions that people perceive about them. They said on a recent interview that they will be addressing all of these issues in their book and that that is the reason why they are writing the book because many people say many things about them that are not true.

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    4. This is Anonymous 9:01 again...I think the fact that Michelle doesn't even mention guiding teenage children in learning to make their own decisions, or coping with the fallout from bad decisions, to be more than telling. Empathy is nice but the business of teens is to learn to be adults, and that means making life choices of their own.

      It is impossible to believe that out of the seven Duggar children who are now adults, not a single one has ambitions that include higher education. Yet none have attended college; there's no evidence that any have even completed a CollegePlus "degree." Are they really free to be making their own decisions?

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  6. Funny, we're a non ATI family and they apply quite effectively and work very well with my teens.

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  7. Apparently spelling is CHALLENGE. You lose credibility when glaring errors such as yours appear and no one bothers to correct them.

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  8. Dear Mary-spelling is the least of the Duggar children's "challenges". Anonymous 15 is pointing out that none of the 18 and over Duggar children are making their own decisions. None have them committed to a college (CollegePlus is a not a college!), or career on their own. main stream over 18 people are either in college or working or military...all without the infamous "accountability" buddy!!!! They have no idea what to do on their own!

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